The Atlantic Revolutions
  • The French Revolution

  • The American Revolution

  • The Haitian Revolution

  • The Venezulan Revolution

Tasks
  • What is Freedom? What is Equality? In your own words define these two principles and find an image for each.
  • Complete background reading of the revolutions listed above (Read, Mark up, and respons to the questions.) - Will be quizzed!!
  • Watch the short power point located here and respond with thoughts or questions you may have, www.voicethread.com/share/1742944/
  • Apply the "Fever Model" of revolution to either the French, Haitian or Venezulan revolution using the template below.


Fever Stage
How this stage applies to the revolution you chose
The Incubation Stage
In a revolution, this stage would involve the political, social, intellectual, or economic causes. In some cases, these causes could fester for many years before showing themselves in the form of actual revolutionary action.

The Symptomatic Stage
In a revolution, this stage would be the first to involve direct action resulting from the social, political, intellectual, or economic causes of the incubation stage. This stage might involve the publication of works calling for a change, street level riots by the common people, or more direct attempts at changing the society.

The Crisis Stage
In a revolution, this stage would be the make or break part of the struggle. It may involve conflict where sides for and against the revolution compete. This competition could take the form of debate or full-scale war. Successful revolutions survive this stage. Those that do not are usually considered failed rebellions.

Convalescence
In a revolution, this stage would involve recovering from the extreme disruptions of the crisis stage. In general, the political, social, intellectual, or economic causes of the revolution must be addressed in some way, though not necessarily to the satisfaction of all revolutionaries.



  • Do you think that this model can be accurately applied to the revolutionary movements occuring today - such as Egypt? - Explain

DBQ - WHAT ARE THE SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN THE MOTIVES CLAIMED BY LEADERS WHO SUPPORTED INDEPENDENCE MOVEMENTS IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD IN THE LATE 18TH AND EARLY 19TH CENTURIES? WHAT ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTS WOULD HELP YOU ANALYZE THEIR MOTIVES?
· IN PAIRS YOU WILL CONSTRUCT A RESPONSE TO THIS QUESTION USING THE DOCUMENTS PROVIDED IN YOUR AP TEXTBOOK. (D-14, D-15)
· YOUR GRADE WILL BE AWARDED USING THE STANDARD AP WORLD DBQ RUBRIC
· IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS DURING THE WRITING PERIOD – YOU MUST ASK – THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN.

SOME TIPS
· MARK UP/ MAKE NOTES ON THE DOCUMENT – HOW DOES EACH DOCUMENT RELATE TO THE QUESTION (BE A CRITICAL THINKER!)
· OUTSIDE CONTENT” – WHILE NOT REQUIRED USE YOUR OUTSIDE KNOWLEDGE TO HELP YOU CAREFULLY ANALYZE THE DOCUMENTS AND PUT THEM IN CONTEXT
· TRY THE FOLLOWING STYLE FOR ATTRIBUTION…HENRY DAVID THOREAU ARGUES IN ON THE DUTY OF CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE (#7) THAT EVEN DEMOCRATIC GOVERNMENTS CAN DO WRONG….
· POINT OF VIEW – SIMPLE ATTRIBUTION IS NOT ENOUGH. YOU MUST ANALYZE – HOW DOES THE PERSPECTIVE/BACKGROUND OF THE AUTHOR AFFECT THE RELIABILITY OF THE DOCUMENT? (USE BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE)
· GROUPING – VERY IMPORTANT SKILL – THINK – NATIONAL GROUP – CHRONOLOGY – CLASS – PURPOSE – GENDER – CULTURAL ATTITUDES. 3 IS THE TARGET NUMBER – DOCUMENTS CAN BE USED MORE THAN ONCE!
· ADDITIONAL DOCUMENT – DON’T FORGET THIS!! I WOULD PUT IT IMMEDIATELY AFTER MY THESIS. – MUST HAVE ONE – BUT AIM FOR AT LEAST TWO!
· THESIS – ANSWER THE QUESTION!!
· TOPIC SENTENCES – WRITE YOUR TOPIC SENTENCES AS IF THERE WERE NO DOCUMENTS (DO NOT REFERENCE THE DOCUMENTS IN YOUR TOPIC SENTENCE!!)

Basic Rubric
Acceptable Thesis: 1 point
Comprehends basic meaning of documents: 1 point
Supports thesis with evidence from documents: 2 points
Analyzes point of view in at least 2 documents: 1 point
Analyzes documents by grouping them. At least two groups: 1 point
Identifies at least 1 additional document: 1 point
Expanded Core – super thesis, convincing evidence, POV in most docs, multiple groups, useful external knowledge, two or more additional docs: 2 points

Below is an example of one way to write the document based question. The essay is not complete but it provides an example of a thesis, additional document, writing style and grouping.

Example DBQ Revolutions: Part 1

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries a wave of revolutionary activity swept Europe and the rest of the Atlantic world. In the documents provided it is clear that all of these revolutions were based on enlightenment ideals and reflect a liberal shift in political and social thought. Within this framework, some documents reflect the desire for political independence while other documents reflect new social goals for men, women, blacks, Indians and Creoles. The major reason for these differences is that each revolutionary leader is influenced by their own experiences. The effect of experience can also account for different motives claimed within a given country; different motives can be defined by gender, race and individual interpretations of equality.

While these documents provide a useful insight into goals claimed by leaders, it would be helpful to see an extract from a diary or a private letter. All of the documents are official proclamations and a personal account may reveal different claims, than those publicly expressed. Also a document from a more radical revolutionary element could provide a broader scope of understanding of motivations claimed. Two examples of such documents would be pamphlet’s produced by the Son’s of Liberty in America, or the Sans Culottes from France.

Revolutions in the Atlantic world were all inspired by the enlightenment ideals of liberty, equality and self determination. In the Americas, the North American colonists were the first to publically cite violations of “the most sacred rights of liberty” (Doc 1) as a basis for independence. The claims of life and liberty are a direct reflection of ideas contained in John Locke’ Treatise of Government which emphasized natural rights. Similarly, principles of liberty and republicanism are demonstrated by the proclamations of Dessallines and Bolivar. In Bolivar’s advice to the Congress of Argentina he claims that Venezuela was motivated by the desire for republican government and popular sovereignty (Doc 6), while Dessalines focuses on the assertion of natural rights, “we have asserted our rights; we swear never to yield them to any power.” (Doc 5)

Despite the shared enlightenment rhetoric, the Americas provide useful insight as to how different experiences account for different motives. In Haiti, Dessallines’ announcement of independence is clearly motivated by a desire to end slavery and racial inequality. His claim that “the frightful veil of prejudice is torn to pieces” (5) is likely motivated by his own experiences as a slave. It is important to note that while Dessallines’ announcement does accurately reflect the latter stages of the Haitian revolution it is not representative of the revolution’s origins. In the American colonies, leaders claimed their primary motivation was to create FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATES (1). This indicates the desire for self determination ranked higher than social equality. The exclusion of the first section of the declaration in which it is claimed that, George III “has waged cruel war against human nature…captivating and carrying them [Africans] into slavery” suggests that the final draft of the Declaration was a compromise. This makes it difficult to ascertain how accurately the claimed motivations reflected the real motivations of different leaders within the American colonies. Bolivar a wealthy criollo, advises Argentina to pursue a hereditary Senate and to proscribe slavery (6). This striking difference in motivation is reflective of the social stratification that existed in Spanish colonial society. It is important to note that this document does not reflect the motivations of Argentine leaders, who may not have shared the same ideas as Bolivar.